Thursday, June 8, 2017

Frank Lloyd Wright


June 08, 1867. RICHLAND CENTER, WI.- Frank Lloyd Wright was an American architect, interior designer, writer and educator, who designed more than 1,000 projects, which resulted in more than 500 completed works. In this image: Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867-1959). Gordon Strong Automobile Objective and Planetarium, Sugarloaf Mountain, Maryland. Project, 1924-25. Perspective. Pencil and colored pencil on tracing paper, 19 3/4 × 30 3/4 (50.2 × 78.1 cm). The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).

He's also famous for desgning buildings which look wonderful but are difficult to live in - poorly ventilated, uncomfortable and expensive to keep up. 

Fifteen things you didn't know: here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Lloyd_Wright

http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/07/architecture/frank-lloyd-wright-architecture-150-years/

http://www.wrightontheweb.net/

Falling Water: http://www.fallingwater.org 

Criticisms of Falling Water: http://www.wright-house.com/frank-lloyd-wright/criticism_fallingwater.html


"Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you." Frank Lloyd Wright, b. #OnThisDay in 1867 http://art.famsf.org/frank-lloyd-wright …

"I know I'm committing art-fan-heresy if not actual art-fan-treason by admitting this, but I'm not a Frank Lloyd Wright fan. Yesyesyes, he was a giant and a mega-talent, and his buildings are often beautiful. (I'm not blind.) But while they're beautiful as structures, they're often absurd as buildings...."

"Simple question: Would you want to live in one of his houses? I wouldn't, for two main reasons. Most important is the way a Frank Lloyd Wright house never becomes your home; instead, you move in and become the curator of one branch of the Frank Lloyd Wright museum. You're just the custodian in a monument to his genius. For the other, I wouldn't want to be in charge of (let alone pay for) the upkeep. Wright couldn't resist trying out innovative building techniques -- which has meant in practice that many of his houses are in semi-constant need of expensive repair. " More at:  http://www.2blowhards.com/archives/000993.html

The Guggenheim: Looks great but not so great for viewing the art. As always, any building that Wright designed was about him, not about the building's use. 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2009/05/25/spiralling-upward

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-triumph-of-frank-lloyd-wright-132535844/ 

1 comment:

Carla Ives said...

I have always loved the Waterfall House but, as noted, his buildings are not easy to live in. There is a new book coming out about him and, from the reviews I've read, it is not flattering. It brings out more of his personal life and his world views which. . . shall we say were a bit different?